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Debt Problems | Bankruptcy District Court Litigation

How to Begin Civil Proceedings in the District Court

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The District Court now has a jurisdictional limit of €15,000.

So, if you need to pursue a debt or a claim for damages for breach of contract, negligence, or on any ground for less than €15,000 you will commence proceedings in the District Court.

To do this, you file, for issue and service, a claim notice in the District Court.

What Must You Put in the Claim Notice?

A claim notice must—

(a) state the full name and address of the claimant and an address for service of documents on the claimant; and

(b) if the claimant sues in person, state an address for service of documents on the claimant; and

(c) if the claimant sues or the respondent is sued in a representative capacity, state the capacity in which the claimant sues or the respondent is sued in a representative capacity; and

(d) state the name and address of the respondent; and

(e) if the claimant sues by a solicitor, state the name or firm and business address of the solicitor and also, if the solicitor is the agent of another, the name or firm and business address of the principal.

A claim notice must contain a statement of claim which must—

(a) contain, in a summary form, a statement of all material facts on which the claimant relies, but not evidence by which those facts are to be proved;

(b) contain the necessary particulars of every fact;

(c) if the claim arises by or under any enactment, identify the specific provision of the enactment that is relied on;

(d) state specifically the amount or other relief or remedy sought; (e) state the place where and the date when the claim arose.

A statement of claim in a debt claim must state that the claim is for debt or liquidated damages, must specify the amount claimed by way of debt or liquidated damages and must include particulars of the claimant’s demand for payment.

Where the claim is founded on any written document, the statement of claim must state the date of the document and the parties to the document and:

(a) if the claim is for the payment of money, the amount claimed, or

(b) if the claim is for breach of contract, the alleged breach or breaches of the contract.

A statement of claim must contain a list of all correspondence and other documents on which the claimant will rely at the trial including the date if any and a brief description of each document.

In a debt claim, the claim notice must be indorsed with a statement as follows—

“If you pay the amount of €…… and costs of €……. to the claimant or the claimant’s solicitor within ten days and without filing and serving an appearance and defence you may avoid further costs.”.

If a claim notice is indorsed  as set out in the preceding paragraph, and the respondent pays the amounts claimed within the time limited for filing and serving an appearance and defence, then the civil proceeding is concluded.

Any claim by a consumer for damages under section 74 of the Consumer Protection Act 2007 (No. 19 of 2007) must be commenced by the issue and service in accordance with this Order of a claim notice, entitled in the matter of section 74 of the Consumer Protection Act 2007 and otherwise in the Form 40.01, Schedule C with such modifications as are appropriate.

 

Where Do You Commence Proceedings?

A claim notice must be filed with and issued by the Clerk for the Court area:

(a) in which the respondent or one of the respondents ordinarily resides or carries on any profession, business or occupation,

or at the election of the claimant,

(b) in proceedings founded on contract, (except proceedings arising from an agreement under the Consumer Credit Act 1995 or the European Communities (Consumer Credit Agreements) Regulations 2010 (S.I. 281 of 2010)) in which the contract is alleged to have been made, or

(c) in proceedings founded on tort, in which the tort is alleged to have been committed, or

(d) in ejectment proceedings, in which the lands the subject of the proceedings are situated.

Unless the Claim Notice is to be served outside the State a claim notice must be in Form 40.01, Schedule C, or in Form 40.02, Schedule C in a debt claim.

Appearance and defence

A respondent who intends to defend civil proceedings must give, or send by post, to the claimant or solicitor for the claimant an appearance and defence, in the Form 42.01, Schedule C, not later than 28 days after the service on him or her of the claim notice, and must at the same time file a copy of his or her appearance with the Clerk.

A defence must—

(a) contain a statement that the respondent intends to defend the claim notice; and

(b) state the name and address of the respondent and an address for service in the European Union at which documents required to be served on the respondent may be left; and

(c) if the respondent defends by a solicitor, state the name or firm and business address within the European Union of the solicitor and also, if the solicitor is an agent of another, the name or firm and business address of the principal.

Appearance and defence to debt claim

An appearance and defence in a debt claim must be in Form 42.03, Schedule C. A respondent who intends to defend a debt claim must give, or send by post, to the claimant or solicitor for the claimant his or her appearance and defence not later than 28 days after the service on him or her of the claim notice, and must at the same time file a copy of his or her appearance with the Clerk.

A defence in a debt claim must state whether the claim is:

(a) disputed as to both liability and amount;

(b) disputed only as to amount and if so, what amount is admitted to be due;

(c) admitted in full and if so, whether the respondent proposes to pay immediately or requires time for payment.

Appearance and defence in claims other than debt claims

Unless the respondent requires further particulars of statement of claim, a respondent to a claim other than a debt claim who contests or disputes all or part of a claimant’s claim must serve an appearance and defence in Form 42.01, Schedule C on the claimant at the address for service stated in the claim notice and must file a copy of the appearance with the Clerk.

A defence must state which of the facts stated in statement of claim are—

(a) admitted;

(b) denied;

(c) not admitted.

A respondent who, in the defence, does not state whether a fact stated in statement of claim is—

(a) admitted;

(b) denied;

(c) not admitted—

must be taken to admit the fact.

A respondent who states that a fact stated in statement of claim is denied must—

(a) give reasons for denying the fact; and

(b) if the respondent intends to prove a fact different from that stated in the statement of claim, state, with necessary particulars, the fact that the respondent intends to prove.

The respondent must state specifically, with particulars, any fact or matter which—

(a) makes the claim of the claimant not maintainable; or

(b) if not stated specifically, might take the claimant by surprise; or

(c) raises questions of fact not arising out of the statement of claim. (6) If the defence arises by or under any enactment, the defence must identify the specific provision relied on.

A defence must contain a list of all correspondence and other documents (other than any documents already identified in the statement of claim) on which the respondent will rely at the trial including the date if any and a brief description of each document.

The respondent may not rely on the defence of tender unless, within seven days after filing an appearance and defence, the respondent pays to the Clerk the amount alleged to have been tendered.

A respondent who has entered an appearance and defence in a debt claim which complies with the requirements of the rule above is not required to serve and file a defence which complies with the requirements of this rule unless an order has been made in the application for judgment on affidavit refusing judgment and giving permission to defend, in which case, the respondent must serve and file a defence which complies with the requirements of this rule within 21 days after the order is made.

Late filing and service of appearance and defence

A respondent may serve an appearance and defence and file an appearance at any time after the service of a claim notice with the written consent of the claimant, but an appearance and defence may not be served, except by permission of the Court, if the claimant has obtained judgment in default of appearance.

NOTICE REQUIRING COPY DOCUMENTS OR FURTHER PARTICULARS

This does not apply to debt claims.

A respondent may at any time before or at the time of delivery of a defence apply to the claimant in writing:

(a) for copies of all or any of the documents listed in the statement of claim on which the claimant relies or referred to in the statement of claim (Form 42.06, Schedule C);

(b) requiring the claimant to provide further particulars which the respondent asserts are reasonably necessary as to specified matters in the statement of claim (Form 42.07, Schedule C).

A claimant may within 28 days after delivery of a defence apply to the respondent in writing:

(a) for copies of all or any of the documents listed in the defence on which the respondent relies or referred to in the defence (Form 42.06, Schedule C);

(b) requiring the respondent to provide further particulars which the claimant asserts are reasonably necessary (Form 42.07, Schedule C).

COUNTERCLAIM

A respondent may set off or set up any right or claim the respondent alleges he or she has against the claimant as a counterclaim against the claim of the claimant, whether the respondent’s claim is a claim in damages or not.

A set off or counterclaim has the same effect as a cross action, so as to enable the Court to determine both the claim and the counterclaim at the same trial.

A counterclaim must be in Form 42.08, Schedule C.

STAY OR DISMISSAL OF CLAIM AND STRIKING OUT STATEMENT OF CLAIM OR DEFENCE

The Court may at any stage of the civil proceedings order to be struck out or amended any matter in any pleading which is unnecessary or scandalous, or which may tend to prejudice, embarrass, or delay the fair trial of the civil proceedings.

The Court may order any pleading to be struck out, on the ground that it discloses no reasonable cause of action or answer and in any such case or in case of the claim or defence being shown by the pleadings to be frivolous or vexatious, the Court may order the claim to be stayed or dismissed, or judgement to be entered accordingly, as the Court considers just.

What to Do Now

Sometimes, especially in debt collection matters, a solicitor’s letter to a debtor may have the desired effect and eliminate the need to bring proceedings in Court.

If you need a solicitor to handle things for you contact us.